Quick Answer: How Do You Describe A Tragedy?

What makes a story a tragedy?

Tragedy is a genre of story in which a hero is brought down by his/her own flaws, usually by ordinary human flaws – flaws like greed, over-ambition, or even an excess of love, honor, or loyalty.

In the end, we feel deep sadness and pity (also called pathos) for the hero..

What are the four characteristics of a tragedy?

Terms in this set (7)Unhappy End. Main character comes to unhappy end.Important in Society. Hero is usually some one important in society.Extraordinary Abilities. … Outside Forces/Antagonist. … Related Events. … Audience’s Sympathy. … Meets Doom.

What are the three elements of a tragedy?

Aristotle defined three key elements which make a tragedy: harmartia, anagnorisis, and peripeteia. Hamartia is a hero’s tragic flaw; the aspect of the character which ultimately leads to their downfall.

What are the types of tragedy?

Types of Tragedy for Drama ClassTragedyLevelGreek TragedyMiddle SeniorRoman TragedySeniorElizabethan and Jacobean TragedyMiddle SeniorRevenge TragedySenior3 more rows•Apr 15, 2015

What defines a Shakespearean tragedy?

Shakespearean tragedy is the designation given to most tragedies written by playwright William Shakespeare. … They share some elements of tragedy featuring a high status central character but end happily like Shakespearean comedies.

What is the function of tragedy?

Aristotle states that the purpose of tragedy is to arouse “terror and pity” and thereby effect the catharsis of these emotions. His exact meaning has been the subject of critical debate over the centuries.

What a tragedy which type of sentence is this?

Answer: What a tragedy! Explanation: It is exclamatory sentence.

What are the 6 elements of tragedy?

Aristotle distinguished six elements of tragedy: “plot, characters, verbal expression, thought, visual adornment, and song-composition.” Of these, PLOT is the most important.

What are the 9 elements of a Shakespearean tragedy?

Terms in this set (10)Tragic Hero. A main character cursed by fate and possessed of a tragic flaw.A Struggle Between Good and Evil. This struggle can take place as part of the plot or exist within the main character.Hamartia. … Tragic Waste. … External Conflict. … Internal Conflict. … Catharsis. … Supernatural Elements.More items…

What is tragedy and example?

In a literary sense, tragedy refers to a specific plot line. … Examples of Tragedy: Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy. The two young lovers meet and fall in love, but because of the age-old feud between their families, they are destined for misfortune.

How do you use tragedy?

Tragedy sentence examplesFor every tragedy, there is a possible happy ending. … As we move toward that future, it is a great tragedy that the experiences of all the people of the past are lost to us. … A Latin tragedy on her fate is attributed, though wrongly, to Seneca.More items…

What is tragedy and its characteristics?

Aristotle defines tragedy according to seven characteristics: (1) it is mimetic, (2) it is serious, (3) it tells a full story of an appropriate length, (4) it contains rhythm and harmony, (5) rhythm and harmony occur in different combinations in different parts of the tragedy, (6) it is performed rather than narrated, …

What are the 5 elements of a Shakespearean tragedy?

Elements of Shakespeare’s TragediesA tragic hero.A dichotomy of good and evil.A tragic waste.Hamartia (the hero’s tragic flaw)Issues of fate or fortune.Greed.Foul revenge.Supernatural elements.More items…•

What is another word for tragedy?

In this page you can discover 63 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for tragedy, like: struggle, affliction, drama, misadventure, lot, misfortune, doom, bad end, no good end, catastrophe and adversity.

What makes a good tragedy?

Definitions: Feel Good Tragedy – A story in which your protagonist(s) lose, but which does not lead to a negative response or emotional state in your story’s audience. Feel Bad Tragedy – A story in which your protagonist(s) lose, and this is upsetting for your story’s audience.